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The Honda CA95 / Benly 150 Restoration The little brother to the CA160 in our family of Hondas

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  #16  
Unread 05-21-2011, 04:40 AM
Jetblackchemist Jetblackchemist is offline
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true that, seats are almost headlight status. Some tutorials on the seats covers or custom ones would be great! I'd like to learn leather working from my friends dad but he lives 3 hours away...When I talk to him to find out what materials he requires and deliver the seat, I'll have to take some photos of some of his work. Theres this one holster thats so awesome I can't even put it into words.
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  #17  
Unread 05-22-2011, 08:04 AM
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Smithers Smithers is offline
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That's one trade I would love to learn more. My dad bought an upholstry staple gun so he could do most of his stuff himself. The best place to learn how to do something: Youtube. Just type in "upholstery" and you'll be a minute or two from learning how to do what you want to do. Just need to find some seat foam or an old piece of furniture that you can steal some from. I know a place that does a great job so I'm hoping they haven't raised their prices in the last year since I talked to them. I would like to see some Benly specific pics of some seat work though.

All in good time.
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  #18  
Unread 05-22-2011, 10:26 AM
wnbasac wnbasac is offline
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tks guys for this great info!
>
so the gasket doesn't need to be made from cork or other gasket material?
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what about the thickness of the gasket, does it need to be as close to the original as possible?
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I have a side cover gasket already on it's way for a clutch job. I'll trace it on some poster paper and save it for any future needs
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do these gaskets go on dry or do you apply some light sealent?
>
tks,Lou
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  #19  
Unread 05-22-2011, 11:01 AM
Spokes Spokes is offline
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I have been following this thread on gaskets. I am aware that you can make gaskets from cardboard and roofing paper and so on. If it was that easy then there would be no gasket industry utilizing multiple types of gasket material.

There is some science into gasket material beyond the shoebox and tar paper.

Buy automotive type materials to do it yourself. Or do what I do. I used a company that makes its living making gaskets.

Bowling Green Rubber & Gasket in Bowling Green KY. When I lived near these folks I would have them cut all of my gaskets + extra's for the next time.

I send out my gasket kits to these folks. I do order thicker oil & fuel resistant gaskets.

I don't risk my mechanical work by using cardboard, roofing paper or the like.

Oh, if I make my own...I photocopy the gasket and just cut it out to make a small template. If I have a large gasket, I take the old one and lay it on cardboard. I spray paint the gasket on the cardboard and make a cardboard template and again just cut it out.
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  #20  
Unread 05-22-2011, 03:37 PM
Jetblackchemist Jetblackchemist is offline
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If your original gasket is rubber, then it needs to be replaced by rubber. The update from cork is also rubber. The gasket needs to be thick enough to make up for any surface irregularities between the two parts. I personally have never had any problems using either a heavy cardboard stock or roofing paper in all the years I've used it. The roofing felt like some gaskets will some times stick to the surface after its been in place many years, and needs to be scrapped off.

Most gaskets were or are impregnated with asbestos for heat dispersion, or graphite. I would say the heavy card stock or roofing felt is better than the graphite, since graphite when wet will start to corrode iron and aluminum. I am not trying to upset the gasket industry I just wanted to let people know there are options if they are the DIY type like myself. I am not sure if Smithers has ever had any problems using homemade gaskets, I myself have not, in the 25 years that I've made my own.

If you're not comfortable making your own, or fear that a home made gasket is inferior then by all means buy them pre-made. Some people wanting to restore one of these bikes, will pay some one else and never touch a wrench, others will do everything except get into the motor then take it to a shop for that part, then others will DIY everything they possibly can including gaskets, paint, refinishing bolts, etc. like myself.

It's a matter of comfort and experience as to how much into a build someone wants to get. I personally haven't ever had a ca95 motor apart or set ones points or timing. I have however, done motor rebuilds, porting and timing and valve jobs on much more complicated engines on other motorcycles and cars. The ca95 engine isn't much different just a little foreign but not intimidating.

So please anyone doing a rebuild etc. do what is in your abilities, no one has the last or final word on whats best for the bike except you as owner so please bear that in mind

Last edited by Jetblackchemist; 05-22-2011 at 03:55 PM. Reason: added spaces to make for easier reading
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diy gasket, gasket, gasket making, need gasket

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